Monday, March 28, 2011

Autism Sensory Integration - Where Do Parents Start

Unfortunately in this day and age there are still people who do not see Sensory Integration as a treatment therapy for children with Autism. Unfortunately many people do not see it as a therapy in its own right.

It is a therapy so intense that is can be puzzling and daunting to people. It is also a therapy so simple with gains that are so important and significant. Whether working with a child who is over sensitive or under sensitive there is help to be had.

The first thing for a parent to think about when considering Sensory Integration is being able to suspend their thoughts and feelings. They have to be able to do that to acquire the empathy of thought and feeling needed to figure out what to do to help their child.

If a child is screaming because they are over sensitive to their environment they will not be able to learn. If a child is so under stimulated that they can not work up the energy to engage they will not be able to learn.

Parents can help a child with Autism that has these characteristics. There are several areas associated with Sensory Integration. These areas are oral, tactile, aural, visual, and proprioceptive. Another way to say this is mouthing, touching, hearing, seeing, and being able to tell where your body is in relation to people and things.

Early consistent speech therapy is critical to a child with Autism. Some children with and without Autism may not need speech therapy or as much speech therapy if they get it early. The same theory works with Sensory Integration.

Early consistent Sensory Integration in all areas may help a child to the extent is may not be needed or needed to that level later. It is not voodoo or magic. It is a consistent application of techniques that work.

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Mylinda Elliott is the parent of five children. The third of the five has Autism which was diagnosed early on. The fourth of the five children has Aspergers. She is a self taught expert on Autism Spectrum Disorders. Mylinda Elliott has also worked professionally in the disability world for the past fifteen years. She is considered the "Go To" woman for advice or resources on disabilities.

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